Tag Archives: Recent Works

The Treaty

treaty3The Treaty imagines a treaty with Aboriginal nations to be in place and is an attempt to resolve the contradictions held in our colonial past and a reminder that this past impacts today, in our attitudes to this land in our own backyards

Paperbark Pixelations

The Eye of Bunjil

eye of bunyil

Melaleuca quinquenervia & Eucalyptus Stellulata

RECENT WORKS

Click on the thumbnails below to view larger images.

Barak Code

‘Barak Code’

Barak Code
‘Barak Code’ Paperbark on MDF, 2m x 3m

BARAK CODE is a remorseful recognition of Wurundjeri culture in my own suburb of Altona. Paperbark sheets (Melaleuca quinquenervia) were lifted from trees in my own street to pixelate Barak, referencing Carl Walter’s 1866 photograph.

RECENT WORKS

‘The Land of Iramoo’

‘Women Collecting at Iramoo’ Oil wax and pigment on canvas 70cm x 200cm

RECENT WORKS

Catherine van Wilgenburg’s recent works of suburban landscapes of Cairnlea, Victoria are layered with first white settler images and text from the journals and notebooks of John Batman & John Helder Wedge’s explorations of Victoria’s western grasslands. Such juxtapositions suggest early settler beliefs about this land & indigenous cultures still hold power. They are the artist’s response to this inheritance with the need to connect with this land and indigenous peoples through her work at Iramoo Sustainable Community Centre, St Albans, Victoria.

Recent paintings ‘The Land of Iramoo‘, by Catherine van Wilgenburg, an exhibition held in conjunction with Edward Clark’s unique collection of Australian colonial silver, offers a new perspective to early white settlement of the area around Melbourne.

Iramoo‘, the original Woiworung language name for the great grassy plains that once encircled the Melbourne area, is the inspiration for contemporary landscape paintings of St Albans, Cairnlea and Caroline Springs.

Click on the thumbnails below to view larger images.


skin

domes
Skin Domes
 

The Land of Iramoo” Oil on canvas 2m x 2m

 

Detail of Borack’s head in “Borack at Avondale Heights

 

Borack and Buckley” Oil and pigment on canvas

These images acknowledge the contradictions held in our colonial past and a reminder that this past impacts on the present in our attitudes to our own backyard.

Australian Coat of Arms” 2m x 2m Oil, wax marble dust on canvas

These grasslands of Iramoo, firstly places of aboriginal dreaming, are significant spiritual lands which provided the wealth represented in these magnificent silver urns and table pieces which graced the tables of the early colonialists.

Triptych “The Treaty’s All Done”

Sulman Prize Finalist triptych “The Treaty’s All Done” is exhibited in Art Gallery of New South Wales Archibald Wynne and Sulman Prizes exhibition until June 2011

 

Left Panel: “Buckley’s Chance in Esssendon”

 

Centre Panel: “Women Collecting Murnong”

 

Right Panel: “Borack in Avondale Heights”

‘Iramoo’ was the Woiworung language name given by first inhabitants of the region, the Kulin Nations, to the great grassy plains that once encircled what is now Melbourne. Iramoo also meant a meeting place between tribes. The name Iramoo is used with permission from the Kulin Nations Cultural Heritage Organisation.

RECENT WORKS

‘The Land of Iramoo’

‘Barak at Avondale Heights’ Oil on canvas 70cm x 90cm

RECENT WORKS

Catherine van Wilgenburg’s recent works of suburban landscapes of Cairnlea, Victoria are layered with first white settler images and text from the journals and notebooks of John Batman & John Helder Wedge’s explorations of Victoria’s western grasslands. Such juxtapositions suggest early settler beliefs about this land & indigenous cultures still hold power. They are the artist’s response to this inheritance with the need to connect with this land and indigenous peoples through her work at Iramoo Sustainable Community Centre, St Albans, Victoria.

Recent paintings ‘The Land of Iramoo‘, by Catherine van Wilgenburg, an exhibition held in conjunction with Edward Clark’s unique collection of Australian colonial silver, offers a new perspective to early white settlement of the area around Melbourne.

Iramoo‘, the original Woiworung language name for the great grassy plains that once encircled the Melbourne area, is the inspiration for contemporary landscape paintings of St Albans, Cairnlea and Caroline Springs.

Click on the thumbnails below to view larger images.

 

The Land of Iramoo” Oil on canvas 2m x 2m

 

Detail of Borack’s head in “Borack at Avondale Heights

 

Borack and Buckley” Oil and pigment on canvas

These images acknowledge the contradictions held in our colonial past and a reminder that this past impacts on the present in our attitudes to our own backyard.

Australian Coat of Arms” 2m x 2m Oil, wax marble dust on canvas

These grasslands of Iramoo, firstly places of aboriginal dreaming, are significant spiritual lands which provided the wealth represented in these magnificent silver urns and table pieces which graced the tables of the early colonialists.

Triptych “The Treaty’s All Done”

Sulman Prize Finalist triptych “The Treaty’s All Done” is exhibited in Art Gallery of New South Wales Archibald Wynne and Sulman Prizes exhibition until June 2011

 

Left Panel: “Buckley’s Chance in Esssendon”

 

Centre Panel: “Women Collecting Murnong”

 

Right Panel: “Borack in Avondale Heights”

‘Iramoo’ was the Woiworung language name given by first inhabitants of the region, the Kulin Nations, to the great grassy plains that once encircled what is now Melbourne. Iramoo also meant a meeting place between tribes. The name Iramoo is used with permission from the Kulin Nations Cultural Heritage Organisation.

RECENT WORKS

‘The Land of Iramoo’

‘Buckley in Essendon’ Oil on canvas 70cm x 200cm

RECENT WORKS

Catherine van Wilgenburg’s recent works of suburban landscapes of Cairnlea, Victoria are layered with first white settler images and text from the journals and notebooks of John Batman & John Helder Wedge’s explorations of Victoria’s western grasslands. Such juxtapositions suggest early settler beliefs about this land & indigenous cultures still hold power. They are the artist’s response to this inheritance with the need to connect with this land and indigenous peoples through her work at Iramoo Sustainable Community Centre, St Albans, Victoria.

Recent paintings ‘The Land of Iramoo‘, by Catherine van Wilgenburg, an exhibition held in conjunction with Edward Clark’s unique collection of Australian colonial silver, offers a new perspective to early white settlement of the area around Melbourne.

Iramoo‘, the original Woiworung language name for the great grassy plains that once encircled the Melbourne area, is the inspiration for contemporary landscape paintings of St Albans, Cairnlea and Caroline Springs.

Click on the thumbnails below to view larger images.

 

The Land of Iramoo” Oil on canvas 2m x 2m

 

Detail of Borack’s head in “Borack at Avondale Heights

 

Borack and Buckley” Oil and pigment on canvas

These images acknowledge the contradictions held in our colonial past and a reminder that this past impacts on the present in our attitudes to our own backyard.

Australian Coat of Arms” 2m x 2m Oil, wax marble dust on canvas

These grasslands of Iramoo, firstly places of aboriginal dreaming, are significant spiritual lands which provided the wealth represented in these magnificent silver urns and table pieces which graced the tables of the early colonialists.

Triptych “The Treaty’s All Done”

Sulman Prize Finalist triptych “The Treaty’s All Done” is exhibited in Art Gallery of New South Wales Archibald Wynne and Sulman Prizes exhibition until June 2011

 

Left Panel: “Buckley’s Chance in Esssendon”

 

Centre Panel: “Women Collecting Murnong”

 

Right Panel: “Borack in Avondale Heights”

‘Iramoo’ was the Woiworung language name given by first inhabitants of the region, the Kulin Nations, to the great grassy plains that once encircled what is now Melbourne. Iramoo also meant a meeting place between tribes. The name Iramoo is used with permission from the Kulin Nations Cultural Heritage Organisation.

RECENT WORKS

‘The Land of Iramoo’

‘Australian Coat of Arms’ 2010 offers a new perspective to early European settlement of the area around Melbourne.The contemporary Australian Coat of Arms is backgrounded by textual references from the field manuscripts and notebooks of the first European explorers of ‘The Land of Iramoo’*
‘Iramoo NW7’ is taken from John Batman’s journals of 1835 as he crossed Iramoo (Woiwurrung for ‘grassland meeting place’ ) This refers to the grasslands of the Western Volcanic Plains of Western Victoria in which Melbourne is sited.
‘Open grassy plains’ is taken from John Helder Wedge’s field manuscripts 1835

RECENT WORKS

Catherine van Wilgenburg’s recent works of suburban landscapes of Cairnlea, Victoria are layered with first white settler images and text from the journals and notebooks of John Batman & John Helder Wedge’s explorations of Victoria’s western grasslands. Such juxtapositions suggest early settler beliefs about this land & indigenous cultures still hold power. They are the artist’s response to this inheritance with the need to connect with this land and indigenous peoples through her work at Iramoo Sustainable Community Centre, St Albans, Victoria.

Recent paintings ‘The Land of Iramoo‘, by Catherine van Wilgenburg, an exhibition held in conjunction with Edward Clark’s unique collection of Australian colonial silver, offers a new perspective to early white settlement of the area around Melbourne.

Iramoo‘, the original Woiworung language name for the great grassy plains that once encircled the Melbourne area, is the inspiration for contemporary landscape paintings of St Albans, Cairnlea and Caroline Springs.

Click on the thumbnails below to view larger images.

 

The Land of Iramoo” Oil on canvas 2m x 2m

 

Detail of Borack’s head in “Borack at Avondale Heights

 

Borack and Buckley” Oil and pigment on canvas

These images acknowledge the contradictions held in our colonial past and a reminder that this past impacts on the present in our attitudes to our own backyard.

Australian Coat of Arms” 2m x 2m Oil, wax marble dust on canvas

These grasslands of Iramoo, firstly places of aboriginal dreaming, are significant spiritual lands which provided the wealth represented in these magnificent silver urns and table pieces which graced the tables of the early colonialists.

Triptych “The Treaty’s All Done”

Sulman Prize Finalist triptych “The Treaty’s All Done” is exhibited in Art Gallery of New South Wales Archibald Wynne and Sulman Prizes exhibition until June 2011

 

Left Panel: “Buckley’s Chance in Esssendon”

 

Centre Panel: “Women Collecting Murnong”

 

Right Panel: “Borack in Avondale Heights”

‘Iramoo’ was the Woiworung language name given by first inhabitants of the region, the Kulin Nations, to the great grassy plains that once encircled what is now Melbourne. Iramoo also meant a meeting place between tribes. The name Iramoo is used with permission from the Kulin Nations Cultural Heritage Organisation.

RECENT WORKS

‘The Land of Iramoo’

‘Barak and Buckley’ Oil and pigment on canvas 60cm x 90cm

RECENT WORKS

Catherine van Wilgenburg’s recent works of suburban landscapes of Cairnlea, Victoria are layered with first white settler images and text from the journals and notebooks of John Batman & John Helder Wedge’s explorations of Victoria’s western grasslands. Such juxtapositions suggest early settler beliefs about this land & indigenous cultures still hold power. They are the artist’s response to this inheritance with the need to connect with this land and indigenous peoples through her work at Iramoo Sustainable Community Centre, St Albans, Victoria.

Recent paintings ‘The Land of Iramoo‘, by Catherine van Wilgenburg, an exhibition held in conjunction with Edward Clark’s unique collection of Australian colonial silver, offers a new perspective to early white settlement of the area around Melbourne.

Iramoo‘, the original Woiworung language name for the great grassy plains that once encircled the Melbourne area, is the inspiration for contemporary landscape paintings of St Albans, Cairnlea and Caroline Springs.

Click on the thumbnails below to view larger images.

The Land of Iramoo” Oil on canvas 2m x 2m

Detail of Borack’s head in “Borack at Avondale Heights

Borack and Buckley” Oil and pigment on canvas

These images acknowledge the contradictions held in our colonial past and a reminder that this past impacts on the present in our attitudes to our own backyard.

Australian Coat of Arms” 2m x 2m Oil, wax marble dust on canvas

These grasslands of Iramoo, firstly places of aboriginal dreaming, are significant spiritual lands which provided the wealth represented in these magnificent silver urns and table pieces which graced the tables of the early colonialists.

Triptych “The Treaty’s All Done”

Sulman Prize Finalist triptych “The Treaty’s All Done” is exhibited in Art Gallery of New South Wales Archibald Wynne and Sulman Prizes exhibition until June 2011

Left Panel: “Buckley’s Chance in Esssendon”

Centre Panel: “Women Collecting Murnong”

Right Panel: “Borack in Avondale Heights”

‘Iramoo’ was the Woiworung language name given by first inhabitants of the region, the Kulin Nations, to the great grassy plains that once encircled what is now Melbourne. Iramoo also meant a meeting place between tribes. The name Iramoo is used with permission from the Kulin Nations Cultural Heritage Organisation.

RECENT WORKS

‘The Land of Iramoo’

‘Barak in St Albans & Caroline Springs’ (Detail) Oil and pigment on canvas 70cm x 200cm

RECENT WORKS

Catherine van Wilgenburg’s recent works of suburban landscapes of Cairnlea, Victoria are layered with first white settler images and text from the journals and notebooks of John Batman & John Helder Wedge’s explorations of Victoria’s western grasslands. Such juxtapositions suggest early settler beliefs about this land & indigenous cultures still hold power. They are the artist’s response to this inheritance with the need to connect with this land and indigenous peoples through her work at Iramoo Sustainable Community Centre, St Albans, Victoria.

Recent paintings ‘The Land of Iramoo‘, by Catherine van Wilgenburg, an exhibition held in conjunction with Edward Clark’s unique collection of Australian colonial silver, offers a new perspective to early white settlement of the area around Melbourne.

Iramoo‘, the original Woiworung language name for the great grassy plains that once encircled the Melbourne area, is the inspiration for contemporary landscape paintings of St Albans, Cairnlea and Caroline Springs.

Click on the thumbnails below to view larger images.

 

The Land of Iramoo” Oil on canvas 2m x 2m

 

Detail of Borack’s head in “Borack at Avondale Heights

 

Borack and Buckley” Oil and pigment on canvas

These images acknowledge the contradictions held in our colonial past and a reminder that this past impacts on the present in our attitudes to our own backyard.

Australian Coat of Arms” 2m x 2m Oil, wax marble dust on canvas

These grasslands of Iramoo, firstly places of aboriginal dreaming, are significant spiritual lands which provided the wealth represented in these magnificent silver urns and table pieces which graced the tables of the early colonialists.

Triptych “The Treaty’s All Done”

Sulman Prize Finalist triptych “The Treaty’s All Done” is exhibited in Art Gallery of New South Wales Archibald Wynne and Sulman Prizes exhibition until June 2011

 

Left Panel: “Buckley’s Chance in Esssendon”

 

Centre Panel: “Women Collecting Murnong”

 

Right Panel: “Borack in Avondale Heights”

‘Iramoo’ was the Woiworung language name given by first inhabitants of the region, the Kulin Nations, to the great grassy plains that once encircled what is now Melbourne. Iramoo also meant a meeting place between tribes. The name Iramoo is used with permission from the Kulin Nations Cultural Heritage Organisation.