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August 2010 Newsletter

 

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In this Issue:

Developing People and Leaders

Recent Paintings and Articles

Recent Projects

New Colour Directions 2010-2011


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Dear ,  

Welcome to Living Colour Studio’s latest newsletter. We hope you find it interesting and informative.

New directions for Living Colour Studio

People working together in great spaces has always been our focus. Our clients and colleagues are keen to take new directions in their personal and business lives to stay aligned with their passion…

And Now…Developing People and Leaders

Within Living Colour Studio, Hans is incorporating the work he started 25 years ago and that is…Developing People and Leaders.  His experience in both large and small companies gives him the insights and experience necessary to be able to critically analyse any business and its leaders to provide a service that produces bottom line results. Read more…

“Hans did so much more for me than what words can say. Now I have a greater understanding of what I have to change to achieve where I want to be with my business. The Integrity and Values Business Profile really helped in selecting the right staff for taking my business forward. I have saved thousands of $$$$ in knowing my new staff are trustworthy, take initiative and responsibility and are loyal – without relying solely on bright testimonials and my own first impressions during the interview!” Prospect Building Surveyors

As Well…

Catherine continues to provide interior design and colour consultancy services while working more intensely on her new series of paintings. See her current June article ‘The Art of Conservation’ in Park Watch magazine of Victoria National Parks Association, featuring her painting ‘Women collecting Murnong’ and her connection with Iramoo Sustainable Living Centre, St Albans and Cairnlea. Link to article ……….and more about the recent paintings.

Recent Projects

Trewenack Residence, Footscray

“We were very clear about our specific needs and always had fun when presenting our ideas…then Hans would challenge us to stretch our thinking further”. Caroline and Mike Trewenack. Read more

Gray Street Residence, Yarraville

“We achieved a record price in the area. We were supported in realising our own design ideas all the way with Hans”. Paris and Michael Hobsbawn. Read more

Mind Body Health Centre, Moonee Ponds

Dr Anne Small, Director of the Mind Body Health Centre, approached Hans because of his collaborative design skills. He consulted with the health practitioners at the Centre to create a loving atmosphere of excellence and compassion that supports healing. In this former Uniting Church Sunday School in Moonee Ponds…Read more

“Finding my Way” Counselling Practice, Clifton Hill

“My house with stables in the backyard has become an income earner through rental and gorgeous rooms for my counselling practice.” Finding My Way. Read more

New Colour Directions 2010-2011

Are you tired of the same old colour schemes that you see absolutely everywhere – boring beige, grumpy grey and lacklustre latte? Check out the new colour directions for 2010/2011 below and add some spice into your environment!

The familiar neutrals are newly accented with influences of sea and sky, while maintaining strong retro and techno influences.

If you’re wanting to experiment with the use of colour in your office or home but aren’t sure where to start, please contact us and we’d be happy to help. Call us NOW to take advantage of our 10% off special offer –             (03) 9687 0786      .

Recent Works Missionary Position

“Reversing the Missionary Position”

Catherine van Wilgenburg’s latest and ongoing series of paintings “Reversing the Missionary Position”.
Click on the thumbnails below to view larger images.

“Someone got Screwed 3″

 

Reversing the MissionaryPosition”

Oil wax on canvas 2m x 2m

 

“Barak at Jones Creek, Cairnlea”

Oil, wax, pigment on canvas 1m x 700cm

 

“The Lizard of Oz” Oil on canvas 500cm x 400cm

 

“Someone got Screwed 1″

 

“Someone got Screwed 2″

 

“Someone got Screwed 3″

Reversing the Missionary Position

The artwork from Catherine van Wllgenburg takes the viewer on a journey into the timeless and the timely. She presents a confronting yet strongly reflective depiction of contact and conflict between the original owners of this land and the colonists intent on usurping both land and people. In her Reversing the Missionary Position series, Van Wilgenburg leads us to an encounter with a people who belonged and still belong to the land. Their images emerge from and are embedded in the earth, in place, while the settlers and soldiers, enshrined in their Britishness, seem out of place, even dislocated in this space of wondrous wattle and banksia.

The artworks traverse the white history of treaties, land ownership and Christian doctrine to highlight the shocking reality of worldview dissonance in the years following the European ‘Enlightenment’. With domination of settlement came domination of the spirits of the land and sea but these significant inspirations were not recognised by the newcomers. While some learned to love the land too, the authorities appropriated the land’s special creatures on the coat of arms. Van Wilgenburg’s strength is her ability to represent this active enclosement of wild places, species and peoples with a clear focus.

Catherine van Wilgenburg is a story teller. She connects us to the story of this place, to the issues which can swirl from memory and asks us to re-member our past and to acknowledge the wounding of both Aboriginal peoples and the land. The sadness which surrounds this story is the on-going legacy of the missionary position. Reversing the missionary position makes the non-Aboriginal viewer look deeply into their own history and our own actions to work towards change and working ‘both ways’.

This perspective is apparent too in her lovely series of Iramoo, an island of western grasslands on the edge of suburbia. The land is blocked off from the surrounding houses. On one side of the fence is the wild, uncontrolled and natural place; on the other, is sense of surveillance and control reminiscent of the wild and tamed land on either side of the famed dingo and rabbit proof fences that snake their way across the continent dividing us from them.

The sense of the wild still lingers in van Wilgenburg’s art. It reminds us to consider that we too are wild, if only we (non-Indigenous residents) scratch the surface and ponder the depths of our inherent connection to the earth.

Dr Sylvie Shaw
Lecturer, Studies in Religion
The University of Queensland,
St Lucia, 4067, Qld

Recent Works Missionary Position

“Reversing the Missionary Position”

Catherine van Wilgenburg’s latest and ongoing series of paintings “Reversing the Missionary Position”.
Click on the thumbnails below to view larger images.

“Someone got Screwed 2″

 

Reversing the MissionaryPosition”

Oil wax on canvas 2m x 2m

 

“Barak at Jones Creek, Cairnlea”

Oil, wax, pigment on canvas 1m x 700cm

 

“The Lizard of Oz” Oil on canvas 500cm x 400cm

 

“Someone got Screwed 1″

 

“Someone got Screwed 2″

 

“Someone got Screwed 3″

Reversing the Missionary Position

The artwork from Catherine van Wllgenburg takes the viewer on a journey into the timeless and the timely. She presents a confronting yet strongly reflective depiction of contact and conflict between the original owners of this land and the colonists intent on usurping both land and people. In her Reversing the Missionary Position series, Van Wilgenburg leads us to an encounter with a people who belonged and still belong to the land. Their images emerge from and are embedded in the earth, in place, while the settlers and soldiers, enshrined in their Britishness, seem out of place, even dislocated in this space of wondrous wattle and banksia.

The artworks traverse the white history of treaties, land ownership and Christian doctrine to highlight the shocking reality of worldview dissonance in the years following the European ‘Enlightenment’. With domination of settlement came domination of the spirits of the land and sea but these significant inspirations were not recognised by the newcomers. While some learned to love the land too, the authorities appropriated the land’s special creatures on the coat of arms. Van Wilgenburg’s strength is her ability to represent this active enclosement of wild places, species and peoples with a clear focus.

Catherine van Wilgenburg is a story teller. She connects us to the story of this place, to the issues which can swirl from memory and asks us to re-member our past and to acknowledge the wounding of both Aboriginal peoples and the land. The sadness which surrounds this story is the on-going legacy of the missionary position. Reversing the missionary position makes the non-Aboriginal viewer look deeply into their own history and our own actions to work towards change and working ‘both ways’.

This perspective is apparent too in her lovely series of Iramoo, an island of western grasslands on the edge of suburbia. The land is blocked off from the surrounding houses. On one side of the fence is the wild, uncontrolled and natural place; on the other, is sense of surveillance and control reminiscent of the wild and tamed land on either side of the famed dingo and rabbit proof fences that snake their way across the continent dividing us from them.

The sense of the wild still lingers in van Wilgenburg’s art. It reminds us to consider that we too are wild, if only we (non-Indigenous residents) scratch the surface and ponder the depths of our inherent connection to the earth.

Dr Sylvie Shaw
Lecturer, Studies in Religion
The University of Queensland,
St Lucia, 4067, Qld

Recent Works Missionary Position

“Reversing the Missionary Position”

Catherine van Wilgenburg’s latest and ongoing series of paintings “Reversing the Missionary Position”.
Click on the thumbnails below to view larger images.

“Someone got Screwed 1″

 

Reversing the MissionaryPosition”

Oil wax on canvas 2m x 2m

 

“Barak at Jones Creek, Cairnlea”

Oil, wax, pigment on canvas 1m x 700cm

 

“The Lizard of Oz” Oil on canvas 500cm x 400cm

 

“Someone got Screwed 1″

 

“Someone got Screwed 2″

 

“Someone got Screwed 3″

Reversing the Missionary Position

The artwork from Catherine van Wllgenburg takes the viewer on a journey into the timeless and the timely. She presents a confronting yet strongly reflective depiction of contact and conflict between the original owners of this land and the colonists intent on usurping both land and people. In her Reversing the Missionary Position series, Van Wilgenburg leads us to an encounter with a people who belonged and still belong to the land. Their images emerge from and are embedded in the earth, in place, while the settlers and soldiers, enshrined in their Britishness, seem out of place, even dislocated in this space of wondrous wattle and banksia.

The artworks traverse the white history of treaties, land ownership and Christian doctrine to highlight the shocking reality of worldview dissonance in the years following the European ‘Enlightenment’. With domination of settlement came domination of the spirits of the land and sea but these significant inspirations were not recognised by the newcomers. While some learned to love the land too, the authorities appropriated the land’s special creatures on the coat of arms. Van Wilgenburg’s strength is her ability to represent this active enclosement of wild places, species and peoples with a clear focus.

Catherine van Wilgenburg is a story teller. She connects us to the story of this place, to the issues which can swirl from memory and asks us to re-member our past and to acknowledge the wounding of both Aboriginal peoples and the land. The sadness which surrounds this story is the on-going legacy of the missionary position. Reversing the missionary position makes the non-Aboriginal viewer look deeply into their own history and our own actions to work towards change and working ‘both ways’.

This perspective is apparent too in her lovely series of Iramoo, an island of western grasslands on the edge of suburbia. The land is blocked off from the surrounding houses. On one side of the fence is the wild, uncontrolled and natural place; on the other, is sense of surveillance and control reminiscent of the wild and tamed land on either side of the famed dingo and rabbit proof fences that snake their way across the continent dividing us from them.

The sense of the wild still lingers in van Wilgenburg’s art. It reminds us to consider that we too are wild, if only we (non-Indigenous residents) scratch the surface and ponder the depths of our inherent connection to the earth.

Dr Sylvie Shaw
Lecturer, Studies in Religion
The University of Queensland,
St Lucia, 4067, Qld

Recent Works Missionary Position

“Reversing the Missionary Position”

Catherine van Wilgenburg’s latest and ongoing series of paintings “Reversing the Missionary Position”.
Click on the thumbnails below to view larger images.

“The Lizard of Oz”

 

Reversing the MissionaryPosition”

Oil wax on canvas 2m x 2m

 

“Barak at Jones Creek, Cairnlea”

Oil, wax, pigment on canvas 1m x 700cm

 

“The Lizard of Oz” Oil on canvas 500cm x 400cm

 

“Someone got Screwed 1″

 

“Someone got Screwed 2″

 

“Someone got Screwed 3″

Reversing the Missionary Position

The artwork from Catherine van Wllgenburg takes the viewer on a journey into the timeless and the timely. She presents a confronting yet strongly reflective depiction of contact and conflict between the original owners of this land and the colonists intent on usurping both land and people. In her Reversing the Missionary Position series, Van Wilgenburg leads us to an encounter with a people who belonged and still belong to the land. Their images emerge from and are embedded in the earth, in place, while the settlers and soldiers, enshrined in their Britishness, seem out of place, even dislocated in this space of wondrous wattle and banksia.

The artworks traverse the white history of treaties, land ownership and Christian doctrine to highlight the shocking reality of worldview dissonance in the years following the European ‘Enlightenment’. With domination of settlement came domination of the spirits of the land and sea but these significant inspirations were not recognised by the newcomers. While some learned to love the land too, the authorities appropriated the land’s special creatures on the coat of arms. Van Wilgenburg’s strength is her ability to represent this active enclosement of wild places, species and peoples with a clear focus.

Catherine van Wilgenburg is a story teller. She connects us to the story of this place, to the issues which can swirl from memory and asks us to re-member our past and to acknowledge the wounding of both Aboriginal peoples and the land. The sadness which surrounds this story is the on-going legacy of the missionary position. Reversing the missionary position makes the non-Aboriginal viewer look deeply into their own history and our own actions to work towards change and working ‘both ways’.

This perspective is apparent too in her lovely series of Iramoo, an island of western grasslands on the edge of suburbia. The land is blocked off from the surrounding houses. On one side of the fence is the wild, uncontrolled and natural place; on the other, is sense of surveillance and control reminiscent of the wild and tamed land on either side of the famed dingo and rabbit proof fences that snake their way across the continent dividing us from them.

The sense of the wild still lingers in van Wilgenburg’s art. It reminds us to consider that we too are wild, if only we (non-Indigenous residents) scratch the surface and ponder the depths of our inherent connection to the earth.

Dr Sylvie Shaw
Lecturer, Studies in Religion
The University of Queensland,
St Lucia, 4067, Qld

Recent Works Missionary Position

“Reversing the Missionary Position”

Catherine van Wilgenburg’s latest and ongoing series of paintings “Reversing the Missionary Position”.
Click on the thumbnails below to view larger images.

“Barak at Jones Creek, Cairnlea” Oil, wax, pigment on canvas 1m x 700cm

 

Reversing the MissionaryPosition”

Oil wax on canvas 2m x 2m

 

“Barak at Jones Creek, Cairnlea”

Oil, wax, pigment on canvas 1m x 700cm

 

“The Lizard of Oz” Oil on canvas 500cm x 400cm

 

“Someone got Screwed 1″

 

“Someone got Screwed 2″

 

“Someone got Screwed 3″

Reversing the Missionary Position

The artwork from Catherine van Wllgenburg takes the viewer on a journey into the timeless and the timely. She presents a confronting yet strongly reflective depiction of contact and conflict between the original owners of this land and the colonists intent on usurping both land and people. In her Reversing the Missionary Position series, Van Wilgenburg leads us to an encounter with a people who belonged and still belong to the land. Their images emerge from and are embedded in the earth, in place, while the settlers and soldiers, enshrined in their Britishness, seem out of place, even dislocated in this space of wondrous wattle and banksia.

The artworks traverse the white history of treaties, land ownership and Christian doctrine to highlight the shocking reality of worldview dissonance in the years following the European ‘Enlightenment’. With domination of settlement came domination of the spirits of the land and sea but these significant inspirations were not recognised by the newcomers. While some learned to love the land too, the authorities appropriated the land’s special creatures on the coat of arms. Van Wilgenburg’s strength is her ability to represent this active enclosement of wild places, species and peoples with a clear focus.

Catherine van Wilgenburg is a story teller. She connects us to the story of this place, to the issues which can swirl from memory and asks us to re-member our past and to acknowledge the wounding of both Aboriginal peoples and the land. The sadness which surrounds this story is the on-going legacy of the missionary position. Reversing the missionary position makes the non-Aboriginal viewer look deeply into their own history and our own actions to work towards change and working ‘both ways’.

This perspective is apparent too in her lovely series of Iramoo, an island of western grasslands on the edge of suburbia. The land is blocked off from the surrounding houses. On one side of the fence is the wild, uncontrolled and natural place; on the other, is sense of surveillance and control reminiscent of the wild and tamed land on either side of the famed dingo and rabbit proof fences that snake their way across the continent dividing us from them.

The sense of the wild still lingers in van Wilgenburg’s art. It reminds us to consider that we too are wild, if only we (non-Indigenous residents) scratch the surface and ponder the depths of our inherent connection to the earth.

Dr Sylvie Shaw
Lecturer, Studies in Religion
The University of Queensland,
St Lucia, 4067, Qld

Recent Works Missionary Position

“Reversing the Missionary Position”

Catherine van Wilgenburg’s latest and ongoing series of paintings “Reversing the Missionary Position”.
Click on the thumbnails below to view larger images.

 

Reversing the Missionary 101kbPosition3

Reversing the Missionary Position” Oil wax on canvas 2m x 2m

Reversing the MissionaryPosition”

Oil wax on canvas 2m x 2m

“Barak at Jones Creek, Cairnlea”

Oil, wax, pigment on canvas 1m x 700cm

“The Lizard of Oz” Oil on canvas 500cm x 400cm

“Someone got Screwed 1″

“Someone got Screwed 2″

“Someone got Screwed 3″

Reversing the Missionary Position

The artwork from Catherine van Wllgenburg takes the viewer on a journey into the timeless and the timely. She presents a confronting yet strongly reflective depiction of contact and conflict between the original owners of this land and the colonists intent on usurping both land and people. In her Reversing the Missionary Position series, Van Wilgenburg leads us to an encounter with a people who belonged and still belong to the land. Their images emerge from and are embedded in the earth, in place, while the settlers and soldiers, enshrined in their Britishness, seem out of place, even dislocated in this space of wondrous wattle and banksia.

The artworks traverse the white history of treaties, land ownership and Christian doctrine to highlight the shocking reality of worldview dissonance in the years following the European ‘Enlightenment’. With domination of settlement came domination of the spirits of the land and sea but these significant inspirations were not recognised by the newcomers. While some learned to love the land too, the authorities appropriated the land’s special creatures on the coat of arms. Van Wilgenburg’s strength is her ability to represent this active enclosement of wild places, species and peoples with a clear focus.

Catherine van Wilgenburg is a story teller. She connects us to the story of this place, to the issues which can swirl from memory and asks us to re-member our past and to acknowledge the wounding of both Aboriginal peoples and the land. The sadness which surrounds this story is the on-going legacy of the missionary position. Reversing the missionary position makes the non-Aboriginal viewer look deeply into their own history and our own actions to work towards change and working ‘both ways’.

This perspective is apparent too in her lovely series of Iramoo, an island of western grasslands on the edge of suburbia. The land is blocked off from the surrounding houses. On one side of the fence is the wild, uncontrolled and natural place; on the other, is sense of surveillance and control reminiscent of the wild and tamed land on either side of the famed dingo and rabbit proof fences that snake their way across the continent dividing us from them.

The sense of the wild still lingers in van Wilgenburg’s art. It reminds us to consider that we too are wild, if only we (non-Indigenous residents) scratch the surface and ponder the depths of our inherent connection to the earth.

Dr Sylvie Shaw
Lecturer, Studies in Religion
The University of Queensland,
St Lucia, 4067, Qld

RECENT WORKS

‘The Land of Iramoo’

‘Women Collecting at Iramoo’ Oil wax and pigment on canvas 70cm x 200cm

RECENT WORKS

Catherine van Wilgenburg’s recent works of suburban landscapes of Cairnlea, Victoria are layered with first white settler images and text from the journals and notebooks of John Batman & John Helder Wedge’s explorations of Victoria’s western grasslands. Such juxtapositions suggest early settler beliefs about this land & indigenous cultures still hold power. They are the artist’s response to this inheritance with the need to connect with this land and indigenous peoples through her work at Iramoo Sustainable Community Centre, St Albans, Victoria.

Recent paintings ‘The Land of Iramoo‘, by Catherine van Wilgenburg, an exhibition held in conjunction with Edward Clark’s unique collection of Australian colonial silver, offers a new perspective to early white settlement of the area around Melbourne.

Iramoo‘, the original Woiworung language name for the great grassy plains that once encircled the Melbourne area, is the inspiration for contemporary landscape paintings of St Albans, Cairnlea and Caroline Springs.

Click on the thumbnails below to view larger images.

 

The Land of Iramoo” Oil on canvas 2m x 2m

 

Detail of Borack’s head in “Borack at Avondale Heights

 

Borack and Buckley” Oil and pigment on canvas

These images acknowledge the contradictions held in our colonial past and a reminder that this past impacts on the present in our attitudes to our own backyard.

Australian Coat of Arms” 2m x 2m Oil, wax marble dust on canvas

These grasslands of Iramoo, firstly places of aboriginal dreaming, are significant spiritual lands which provided the wealth represented in these magnificent silver urns and table pieces which graced the tables of the early colonialists.

Triptych “The Treaty’s All Done”

Sulman Prize Finalist triptych “The Treaty’s All Done” is exhibited in Art Gallery of New South Wales Archibald Wynne and Sulman Prizes exhibition until June 2011

 

Left Panel: “Buckley’s Chance in Esssendon”

 

Centre Panel: “Women Collecting Murnong”

 

Right Panel: “Borack in Avondale Heights”

‘Iramoo’ was the Woiworung language name given by first inhabitants of the region, the Kulin Nations, to the great grassy plains that once encircled what is now Melbourne. Iramoo also meant a meeting place between tribes. The name Iramoo is used with permission from the Kulin Nations Cultural Heritage Organisation.

RECENT WORKS

‘The Land of Iramoo’

‘Barak at Avondale Heights’ Oil on canvas 70cm x 90cm

RECENT WORKS

Catherine van Wilgenburg’s recent works of suburban landscapes of Cairnlea, Victoria are layered with first white settler images and text from the journals and notebooks of John Batman & John Helder Wedge’s explorations of Victoria’s western grasslands. Such juxtapositions suggest early settler beliefs about this land & indigenous cultures still hold power. They are the artist’s response to this inheritance with the need to connect with this land and indigenous peoples through her work at Iramoo Sustainable Community Centre, St Albans, Victoria.

Recent paintings ‘The Land of Iramoo‘, by Catherine van Wilgenburg, an exhibition held in conjunction with Edward Clark’s unique collection of Australian colonial silver, offers a new perspective to early white settlement of the area around Melbourne.

Iramoo‘, the original Woiworung language name for the great grassy plains that once encircled the Melbourne area, is the inspiration for contemporary landscape paintings of St Albans, Cairnlea and Caroline Springs.

Click on the thumbnails below to view larger images.

 

The Land of Iramoo” Oil on canvas 2m x 2m

 

Detail of Borack’s head in “Borack at Avondale Heights

 

Borack and Buckley” Oil and pigment on canvas

These images acknowledge the contradictions held in our colonial past and a reminder that this past impacts on the present in our attitudes to our own backyard.

Australian Coat of Arms” 2m x 2m Oil, wax marble dust on canvas

These grasslands of Iramoo, firstly places of aboriginal dreaming, are significant spiritual lands which provided the wealth represented in these magnificent silver urns and table pieces which graced the tables of the early colonialists.

Triptych “The Treaty’s All Done”

Sulman Prize Finalist triptych “The Treaty’s All Done” is exhibited in Art Gallery of New South Wales Archibald Wynne and Sulman Prizes exhibition until June 2011

 

Left Panel: “Buckley’s Chance in Esssendon”

 

Centre Panel: “Women Collecting Murnong”

 

Right Panel: “Borack in Avondale Heights”

‘Iramoo’ was the Woiworung language name given by first inhabitants of the region, the Kulin Nations, to the great grassy plains that once encircled what is now Melbourne. Iramoo also meant a meeting place between tribes. The name Iramoo is used with permission from the Kulin Nations Cultural Heritage Organisation.

RECENT WORKS

‘The Land of Iramoo’

‘Buckley in Essendon’ Oil on canvas 70cm x 200cm

RECENT WORKS

Catherine van Wilgenburg’s recent works of suburban landscapes of Cairnlea, Victoria are layered with first white settler images and text from the journals and notebooks of John Batman & John Helder Wedge’s explorations of Victoria’s western grasslands. Such juxtapositions suggest early settler beliefs about this land & indigenous cultures still hold power. They are the artist’s response to this inheritance with the need to connect with this land and indigenous peoples through her work at Iramoo Sustainable Community Centre, St Albans, Victoria.

Recent paintings ‘The Land of Iramoo‘, by Catherine van Wilgenburg, an exhibition held in conjunction with Edward Clark’s unique collection of Australian colonial silver, offers a new perspective to early white settlement of the area around Melbourne.

Iramoo‘, the original Woiworung language name for the great grassy plains that once encircled the Melbourne area, is the inspiration for contemporary landscape paintings of St Albans, Cairnlea and Caroline Springs.

Click on the thumbnails below to view larger images.

 

The Land of Iramoo” Oil on canvas 2m x 2m

 

Detail of Borack’s head in “Borack at Avondale Heights

 

Borack and Buckley” Oil and pigment on canvas

These images acknowledge the contradictions held in our colonial past and a reminder that this past impacts on the present in our attitudes to our own backyard.

Australian Coat of Arms” 2m x 2m Oil, wax marble dust on canvas

These grasslands of Iramoo, firstly places of aboriginal dreaming, are significant spiritual lands which provided the wealth represented in these magnificent silver urns and table pieces which graced the tables of the early colonialists.

Triptych “The Treaty’s All Done”

Sulman Prize Finalist triptych “The Treaty’s All Done” is exhibited in Art Gallery of New South Wales Archibald Wynne and Sulman Prizes exhibition until June 2011

 

Left Panel: “Buckley’s Chance in Esssendon”

 

Centre Panel: “Women Collecting Murnong”

 

Right Panel: “Borack in Avondale Heights”

‘Iramoo’ was the Woiworung language name given by first inhabitants of the region, the Kulin Nations, to the great grassy plains that once encircled what is now Melbourne. Iramoo also meant a meeting place between tribes. The name Iramoo is used with permission from the Kulin Nations Cultural Heritage Organisation.